Dry Land SUP Training – Part Two

Five Stand Up Paddle Boarding Exercises for the Office

In our last installment, a typical New Years cajoling that your SUP days are quickly approaching. And while I’d rather be telling you about all the new paddle boards coming your way, this kind of article is key to keeping on it once you get hooked by the SUP bug. So I thought I’d take one more swipe at some easy to do exercises that will make the first SUP adventure one to remember, and not because you can’t move the next day.

Stand up paddle boarding, for all of its benefits – fresh air, open water, good times with friends – is taxing on your body. Some of us are in better shape than others and can easily transition from the couch to the water. Others need to stay as limber as possible.

We spoke about the good old fashioned push-up, the SUP squat and the SUP lunge as excellent all-around exercises that employ every muscle group. Today, we’re going to look at some quick, do anywhere routines.

Dipping Bird

Dipping Bird

First up is the dipping bird. This is preferably done with small hand weights and involves the lumbo pelvic group – or in lay terms, that whole hip area. Your core strength is essential in all activities but on a paddle board, it creates an added level of stabilization and as an added bonus, strengthens the main part of the paddle stroke.

The mountain climber is basically the push-up taken to the next level.

This amazing full body exercise works the deltoids, biceps, triceps, pectoralis major, obliques, rectus abdominals, lower trapezius, latissimus dorsi, quadriceps, hamstrings, hip adductors, and the hip abductors. Did I leave anything out? I did: your heart. This is one heck of a cardio workout once you get faster at doing it. Start out slow and gradually increase your pace.

Mountain climber

Mountain climber

Standing leg extension

Standing leg extension

In between push-ups and the mountain climber, simply plank. This a push-up at the beginning without the push. It is a mountain climber without the climb. It is essentially a yoga pose with huge beginner benefits in your arms and abdomen, more essential muscle groups that feel the pain due to lack of off-season conditioning.

The standing leg extension works on your balance – if it is done right. The key to doing this correctly is keeping your foot flat on the floor. This will blast your legs and increase your balance. This is not easy and if you initially need to, use something to aid in keeping your balance.

Standing warrior pose

Standing warrior pose

And lastly, the one legged warrior pose, another all around yoga position that does more than you think, and as a result, is harder than you might imagine. Beside the core workout, it works hamstrings and thighs, creates a sense of balance, and even though it doesn’t look like it might, actually strengthens your back, shoulders and arms. Yoga folks will recognize this position as well and will probably add that it also quiets the mind. Just remember to keep your hips straight.

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